Children with epilepsy, additional rights

About Epilepsy, Epilepsy and Children
Patients with epilepsy have the right to be examined by the most modern methods and treatment (with the use of effective antiepileptic drugs). Patients with epilepsy have the right to receive free antiepileptic drugs included in the list of vital medicines. The list of medicines issued for free, is regularly changed, so the latest information on this matter can be obtained from the attending physician. Parents have the right to issue a disability to a child suffering from epilepsy in the presence of attacks resistant to therapy. Security measures at home All sources of fire must have reliable covers, and heating devices must be removed to a safe place. If the child sometimes have sudden (without aura) seizures, you can put on the corners of the furniture plastic rounded plates.…
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Child with Epilepsy

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Like other children, children with epilepsy need communication and a society of peers. As for other parents, the opportunity to send a child to a kindergarten for parents of a child with epilepsy is an opportunity to work or free time for themselves. Work, of course, - the best financial assistance (which is especially important for single-parent families); and the possibility of professional implementation significantly improves the quality of life of parents and reduces parental stress associated with the disease of the child. If there is no need for the mother to go to work, the emergence of free time, which can be devoted to favorite activities or care for other family members, also leads to an improvement in the mood of the mother, the microclimate in the family and…
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Video-EEG monitoring

Encyclopedia of Epilepsy for Patients
Video-EEG monitoring The main method of diagnosis of epilepsy is electroencephalography (EEG). However, with a single record of EEG in a clinic or in a medical center, usually carried out in the period between attacks, pathological changes are not always detected. This is due to the fact that the probability of an attack at the time of recording the EEG is not high enough. At the same time, some patients (though not all) changes in EEG are detected only during attacks. Therefore, the most valuable diagnostic method is the long-term recording of EEG. EEG monitoring (long — term EEG recording for several hours, usually during the day) and video EEG monitoring-EEG monitoring in combination with constant video recording, allowing you to get a record of EEG during the attack at…
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Pregnancy and epilepsy

Encyclopedia of Epilepsy for Patients
Pregnancy and epilepsy In some cases, pregnancy does not change the frequency of seizures, and sometimes even improves the control of seizures, but in about 1/3 of cases there is a deterioration in the control of seizures during pregnancy. This may be due to a number of factors. High levels of estrogen/progesterone may play a role in the first trimester of pregnancy. In addition, there is a decrease in the level of some AEP in plasma due to physiological processes occurring during pregnancy. In 2 and 3 trimesters of pregnancy, the volume of blood plasma increases by about 1/3, thereby reducing the concentration of AEP when administered in the body of the previous dose. Changes in AEP concentrations are also explained by an increase in the rate of excretion of…
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Atonic seizures

Encyclopedia of Epilepsy for Patients
Atonic seizures Atonic seizures are a rarer type of epileptic seizures (less than 1% of all seizures with epilepsy). They occur in some severe forms of epilepsy, with onset in early childhood, such as Lennox-gasto syndrome. Atonic attacks are manifested by a sudden loss of muscle tone, the patient " goes limp "and falls (slowly"settles"). Convulsive contractions are absent. Atonic seizures are often the result of severe brain damage. Aura The aura is unusual, but specific to the patient's feelings, which is the initiation (beginning) focal seizure (e.g., visual illusions, a sense of unpleasant odor, fear, etc.). Aura-the result of a pathological discharge in a certain area of the cortex and depends on the function performed by this part of the cortex. If the epileptic discharge remains localized, the consciousness…
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encyclopedia of epilepsy for patients

Encyclopedia of Epilepsy for Patients
Encyclopedia of Epilepsy for Patients Epileptica Absence seizures previously were called attacks of "petit mal" ("small attacks"). Attacks of this type begin in childhood and adolescence. As a rule, they do not occur in other age groups. The appearance of absence seizures in adults requires the exclusion of focal seizures (as sometimes focal seizures can resemble absence seizures its external manifestations). With the development of the attack the patient suddenly stops, the gaze seems empty, missing (simple absence seizure); perhaps the tremor of the eyelids, swallowing and throwing back the head or drop the head on the chest, redness or pallor of the face, automatic movements (complex absense). The attacks are very short (lasting several seconds), and how the patient and the surrounding, can not see them. Adults can interpret…
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Epilepsy in Children and Adolescents

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Epilepsy in children and adolescents EPILEPSY is a chronic disease of the brain, manifested by repeated convulsive or convulsive attacks (paroxysms) and specific changes in personality. The prevalence of epilepsy in childhood and adolescence is 5-8 cases per 1000 children, which significantly exceeds the prevalence of epilepsy in adults. These figures include only patients with repeated seizures requiring medical supervision and taking anticonvulsant medications. The number of children who have had at least a single epileptic seizure is much higher and accounts for 5-7% of the child population. Epilepsy is characterized by the onset of seizures in childhood and adolescence (more than 75% of cases of epilepsy manifest in the first two decades of life). There are three peaks of epilepsy manifestations: at the first year of life, at the…
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How I Learned to Live with Epilepsy

Live with Epilepsy
How I Learned to Live with Epilepsy NOW I AND MY DIAGNOSIS IS "EPILEPSY", ONE MIGHT SAY, BECAME FRIENDS. It's like we were just Dating before, and now we realize we're serious, and we're moving in together. I wasn't going to live with epilepsy before, but I'm studying now. It imposes on my daily routine are not so irreconcilable restrictions, but they are still depressing. Sometimes there is a feeling as if you have planned a busy weekend with friends, and you, as a child, are driven home ahead of time — only you are already an adult. We are very different: I am a moderate, love to do everything as if tomorrow is the end of the world, to have fun spontaneously, to shed hundreds of cubic meters of…
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What not to do with Epilepsy

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What not to do with Epilepsy Epilepsy is a condition in which a person has regularly repeated epileptic seizures. These seizures are characterized as abnormal, disorderly discharge of nerve cells of the brain, which leads to a temporary violation of motor, sensory or mental functions of the patient. Knowledge of the basic principles that can not be done with epilepsy, can help the patient to avoid dangerous situations and injuries in daily activities. Manifestation of the Disease There are many types of epileptic seizures, primarily depending on which part of the brain is involved in the pathological process. The specific area of the brain affected by abnormal electrical activity can lead to a specific type of seizure. If all parts of the brain are involved in abnormal electrical activity of…
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The Causes of Epilepsy in a Child

Epilepsy and Children
Risk Factors for the Disease Epilepsy in children is a chronic neurological disease, which is characterized by the predisposition of the baby to the appearance of convulsive attacks. Accurately identify the causes of epilepsy in a child can not in all cases, because the nature of the disease is not yet fully understood. Pathology is diagnosed most often in children aged 5 to 18 years. Predisposition to the Development of the Disease A number of factors that affect the appearance of epilepsy: Brain lesions (including infectious Genesis-meningitis, encephalitis); Head injuries; Generic head injuries Perinatal encephalopathy; The appearance of seizures, which are not associated with epilepsy; Febrile convulsions; Spasmophilia; Convulsions due to administration of drugs; Seizures caused by metabolic disorders; Epiactivity on EEG. Bce the above factors are signs of a…
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